Elevate Difference

Bitch (Issue #39: Wired)

Having never read an issue of Bitch, I found myself apprehensive when beginning my read of "The Wired Issue." The word "bitch" conjures a menagerie of intimidating persons to mind, and my expectation was that the content would be something similar. While I encountered a few impassioned articles and editorials, the majority of the issue's content was exploratory, explanatory, and thought provoking.

The magazine describes itself as the "feminist response to pop culture," and its content covers a range of topics including technology, the media, music, and film. "The Wired Issue" explores feminism in the digital ageā€”from the affects of coffee on women's systems to misogyny in the blogosphere and "Bionic Betties." Enlightening? Most definitely.

While some readers might leave the issue feeling as if the writers are all under the impression that it's "us" against "them," the majority of their observations are overwhelmingly true. For instance, when was the last time you heard about a male blogger being threatened with rape and the kidnapping of his children? Also published in this issue is an article on how to spot bunk reporting, a skill we could all use in a world of aggregators and recycled leads.

Ultimately, I discovered that Bitch provides perspectives from men and women of varying ethnic backgrounds on topics you won't find anywhere else. I am particularly fond of the "Bitch List" column, which is described as "an annotated guide to some of our favorite things." Without it, I know I never would have heard of drag king trading cards or the crocheted uteri doll.

Even if you can't find "The Wired Issue" I recommend investing in a copy of Bitch. Its illuminating content may turn the time you devote to casual reading into something a bit more fulfilling.

Written by: Lizz Clements, June 11th 2008

No worries. It was a good, valid question! :)

Ah, dumb me for not checking to see if there were other Bitch reviews! I will do that now (with my tail between my legs) My apologies!

Dear Professor:Thank you for your thoughful comments about this review. They are always appreciated. To answer the question that I believe is directed at me, our writers regularly review Bitch (enter "Bitch" into the search box to read reviews of past issues), and some of our past reviews have been by writers who have a greater familiarity with the magazine. As per our mission statement, we believe that the perspectives of both old and new readers are valuable; therefore, we are happy to provide a forum where both can comment on the contributions of Bitch to print media, pop culture, and feminism.Peace,Ama Lee

"While I encountered a few impassioned articles and editorials the majority of the issue's content was exploratory, explanatory, and thought provoking."Lizz, Your quote above indicates impassioned articles and editorials are a bad thing. While the 'angry man-hating feminist' is a stereotype that refuses to die, I don't think this should make those of us who are proud proclaimers of the f-word wary of passion and opinion. Further, your claim that "The word "bitch" conjures a menagerie of intimidating persons to mind, and my expectation was that the content would be something similar" lacks reference to the feminist reclamation of the word -- not only in the magazine itself, but in classic works like The Bitch Manifesto by Jo Freeman.I encourage readers of this cite to check out the magazine -- it offers, as it subtitle promises, excellent feminist analysis of pop culture.As a side note, to the editors, Bitch is an important player in the small world of feminist magazines, I am wondering why you didn't opt for a reviewer familiar with the mag rather than someone who has read only one issue?

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