Elevate Difference

Reviews tagged environment

Our Daily Bread

Our Daily Bread uses visual images to show the deplorable conditions that are inflicted on animals and the toxic spraying of crops to awaken the public to the reality of our food supply. This film also shows the isolation and monotony faced by workers in the industry. Our Daily Bread was a thought-provoking film that left me horrified by its disturbing images and concerned for my family’s welfare. Unfortunately, some of the scenes were so upsetting to me that I was unable to watch them.

Let's Get Primitive: The Urban Girl’s Guide to Camping

If you’ve always wanted to go camping, but have been overwhelmed by the prospect of choosing a sleeping bag, securing permits, packing supplies and keeping clean in the wild then you’re in luck! This little book is all you’ll need to get out of the city and into the great outdoors. Heather Menicucci explores all aspects of camping, from gear and games to toilets and tents.

Gasp! The Swift and Terrible Beauty of Air

When I first received Gasp! The Swift and Terrible Beauty of Air, I couldn't believe that someone could write a 400 some paged book on the subject of air. But after reading this book, I realized that kind of attitude is exactly the basic root of the problem. Joe Sherman explores everything there is to explore about air, from why a child takes their first breath to the evolution of Earth's atmosphere and all the radical scientists who discovered truths about our air.

A Place for Dialogue: Language, Land Use, and Politics in Southern Arizona

Sharon Stevens has dual intention for A Place for Dialogue. She has brought to light the conflicts between ranching, grazing and conservation in Southern Arizona.


This inspirational memoir traces the life of an extraordinary woman. Wangari Maathai was born in 1940 in a small Kikuyu community in Kenya. Throughout the memoir we watch Maathai’s life change and progress alongside Kenyan society. The memoir unfolds with stories of Kikuyu traditions and beliefs as a young Maathai plants crops alongside her mother.

The Ten Minute Activist

The Ten Minute Activist provides a dense, insightful education into what one individual can do, or not do, to live in a more environmentally conscious manner. It is not written in a preachy or condescending manner; instead, its authors, five individuals jointly known as The Mission Collective, have written a witty and approachable text. What, you ask, are some of the issues that are discussed in The Ten Minute Activist?

Is That a Hybrid or Are You Just Happy to See Me T-shirt

It’s reassuring that edgier girls, even when they become moms, can look to Rudechix tees for a little self-reverential, sassy fun. A phenomenon that hit big from its very first chops busting attitude tee in 2004 (“I’m Cuter Than You”), Rudechix is hotter and ruder than ever with a new series of to-die-for tee collections, including The Tattoo Line, The Environmental Line, The Bitter Waitress Collection and The Baby Surf Collection. The fantastically inventive Sherry Mattson, owner and president of the company, is all about creating something beyond the typically prosaic one-liner.

Bitch (Issue #34: Green)

Trust Bitch to subvert their very own issue’s theme! In their Winter 2006 issue, they approach what has been become a trend in the magazine world from Elle to Vanity Fair: the “Green issue.” Thankfully, in the spirit of their moniker, the magazine offers a creative response to the very definition of what “green” might entail.

An Unreasonable Woman: A True Story of Shrimpers Politicos Polluters and The Fight For Seadrift, Texas

Diane Wilson may hail from Texas, but An Unreasonable Woman, which takes the reader from the Gulf Coast to Taiwan and back, is no tall tale. In 1989, Wilson, a shrimper and mother of five, read a newspaper article reporting that her native Calhoun County (pop. 15,000) was the most polluted county in the nation. When she started inquiring about the chemicals being dumped into her beloved San Antonio Bay, getting the cold shoulder from government officials and the polluters only made Wilson more determined.

Globalization from Below: Transnational Activists and Protest Networks

On November 30, 1999, roughly 50,000 demonstrators descended upon Seattle, Washington, to protest the World Trade Organization (WTO) conference. The mission of the conference was to increase global market liberalization, and every imaginable progressive activist group was in attendance—from Greenpeace and the AFL-CIO to the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, whose members donned turtle costumes and patrolled the crowds to promote non-violence.